MACO Organization

Task Force 31 MACO Organization

This section will describe the organizational structure of the MACO, and what new Special Warfare Operators and Officers should know before getting and creating their own MACO Company (MCO).

Organization of MACO Units

From the smallest to the largest, the order of MACO units is as follows:

Individual Special Warfare Operator/Special Warfare Officer (Operator)
MACO Operational Detachment (MOD)
MACO Company (MCO)
MACO Battalion (MBN)
MACO Group (MGRP)
MACO Command (MACOCOM)

MACO Special Warfare Operator and Special Warfare Officer
The base of any organization is its base. For the Task Force 31 MACO that base is its individual members. Without the individual member, the MACO can not have the MACO Operational Detachments, and without the MACO Operational Detachments, the MACO can not have the MACO Company and so on and so forth. It is this reason that we emphasize the importance of our Special Warfare Operators and Special Warfare Officers.

MACO Special Warfare Operators and Special Warfare Officers fall into one of two general categories: Active Duty or Reservist. An Active Duty MACO participates with their MACO Operational Detachment as well as their Task Force 31 chapter exclusively as a Task Force 31 MACO. They are known only by their MACO rank, they wear only their MACO uniform, etc. This is not to say that they do not participate in regular Task Force 31 functions, but they do so as a marine. Marines who still occasionally (or even frequently) participate as a “naval” Task Force 31 member (still use their naval rank, wear their regular Task Force 31 uniform, etc.) are said to be Reserve MACO or simply reservists.

MACO Operational Detachment (MOD)
The MACO Operational Detachment is the lowest unit in MACO. This can be one single lone Special Warfare Operator/Officer up to an entire station/ship. The Special Warfare Operator/Officer in charge of the MOD is known as the “Detachment Team Leader” while his second in command is known as the “Assistant Detachment Team Leader”. The MOD for comparison purposes would be approximately a platoon size element.

The MOD is part of an already existing MACO Company that is headquartered on another Task Force 31 station/ship. That Headquarters still accounts for the MACO Operators assigned to that MOD, and is responsible for all administrative actions such as awards and rolls up the MOD report into the Company monthly report. The MOD does not send a report to MACOCOM. The MOD maintains the Company unit identification number, unit logo, “Nick name” etc. (example: The 31st MACO is assigned to the USS Victorious, but has a MOD assigned to the Station Robert de Bruce, then that MOD would still be a part of the 31st MACO, and wear the same unit insignia, with the only exception being the unit MACO patch would have the Robert de Bruce name instead of the Victorious.)

MACO Company (MCO)
The MACO Company (also referred to as a MACO Team) is the basic MACO unit. The size of a MCO varies considerably, depending on the location and unit type. A MCO can be can be one single lone Special Warfare Operator/Officer up to two dozen or more. The Special Warfare Operator/Officer in charge of the MCO is known as the “Company Commander (also referred to as the Team Leader)” while his second in command is known as the “Executive Officer (also referred to as the Assistant Team Leader)”.

MACO Battalion (MBN) & MACO Group (MGRP)
Just as STARFLEET is divided administratively into geographic “Regions.” In the Task Force 31 MACO, each STARFLEET Region is called a Sector, which intern each Sector is a MACO Group. In other words, Region 15 in STARFLEET would be known in the Task Force 31 MACO as Sector 15 and the MACO Command structure would be the Fifteenth MACO Group or in shorthand “15MGRP.” Within each MGRP, each state (or other geographic subdivision in the case of international MGRPs) is considered a MBN. MBNs are numbered in relation to the other states in their region/sector— usually in alphabetical order. In our example of the 15MGRP, then, 1MBN (First MACO Battalion) is Connecticut, 2MBN is Maine, 3MBN is Massachusetts, 4MBN is New Hampshire, 5MBN is Rhode Island and 6MBN is Vermont, etc.

Both the MBN and MGRP have a command structure very similar to one another. The MBN has a MBN Commander, MBN Executive Officer and a MBN Command Sergeant Major. Depending on the number of MCOs within a MBN area of operations will decide how much additional MBN staff is needed. There are several MBN staff positions available to assist the MBN Commander. These positions are:

S-1 Personnel Officer
S-2 Intelligence Officer
S-3 Operations Officer
S-4 Logistics Officer
S-5 Training Officer
S-6 Communications Officer
S-7 Public Affairs Officers

It is up to the MBN Commander as to which staff position he wishes to utilize, if any at all.

The MGRP has a MGRP Commander, MGRP Executive Officer and a MGRP Command Sergeant Major. Depending on the number of MCO MBNs are operational will decide how much additional MGRP staff is needed. Like the MBN, there are several MGRP staff positions available to assist the MGRP Commander. These positions are:

S-1 Personnel Officer
S-2 Intelligence Officer
S-3 Operations Officer
S-4 Logistics Officer
S-5 Training Officer
S-6 Communications Officer
S-7 Public Affairs Officers

It is up to the MGRP Commander as to which staff position he wishes to utilize, if any at all.

Note: At this point in time, both MBN and MGRP Commanders and their staffs are not in use, but as Task Force 31 MACO grows, they will be activated into the command structure.

MACO Command (MACOCOM)
The MACO Command is the Headquarters Section that oversees the entire Task Force 31 MACO program. More will be discussed later in the chapter.

MACO Company Designation Number

The numbers available to be assigned to new MCO are determined by the new MCO and it’s members. However, no two or more units can have the same number. The numbering priority goes to the unit that first had the desired number. The Task Force 31 MACO G-3, MACO Operations Officer (MG3) will insure duplicate numbers are not being utilized.

Task Force 31 MACO do not predesignate or associate the MCO designation numbers to any one sector like other organizations. The primary reason for this is that many of our MCO have unit patches which have their MCO designation number listed, thus if we had set MCO designation numbers, the units would also have to change patches that had already had made and many of the MCO do not have funds to re-order patches.

Putting It Together

Here is an example of how a MCO fits into the Task Force 31 MACO organization. We will demonstrate each level of the Task Force 31 MACO, as it applies to a single unit, the 230th MACO “Strike Eagles”, also known as MCO-230, which is stationed aboard the USS George Washington in Newport, Rhode Island.

MACO Company: All the MACO Special Warfare Operators from the crew of the USS George Washington together make up the 230th MACO Company.

MACO Battalion: Sector 15 is made up of Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island and Vermont. That makes Connecticut 1st Battalion, Maine 2nd Battalion, Massachusetts 3rd Battalion, New Hampshire 4th Battalion, Rhode Island 5th Battalion, and Vermont 6th Battalion. This makes Rhode Island the 5th Battalion. Now we have the 230th MCO, 5th MBN.

MACO Group: The 230th is in the 15th MACO Group, since Rhode Island is in Sector 15. So the 230th’s total unit designation is 230th MCO, 5MBN, 15MGRP.

MACO Training Company: MACO Training Company (MTCO) is a designation for a MACO Company in which the MCO Commander (Team Leader) is not certified as a MACO Team Leader at the time the request to activate a MCO is submitted. The MCO Commander will have one (1) year to become certified otherwise the MTCO will be deactivated. Once a MTCO has been deactivated due to the circumstances mention above, the MTCO Commander will have to become certified before allowing the MTCO to be re-activated as either a MTCO or MCO.

Note: The Task Force 31 MACO do not utilize any “maneuver unit” above the MACO Group level.

Current MACO Sector Coverage Areas

Sector 1
1st Military Assault Command Operations Group (01)
Kentucky, Indiana, North Carolina, Ohio, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia and West Virginia

Sector 2
2nd Military Assault Command Operations Group (02)
Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, Puerto Rico and the Caribbean

Sector 3
3rd Military Assault Command Operations Group (03)
Texas and Louisiana

Sector 4
4th Military Assault Command Operations Group (04)
Arizona, California, Hawaii and Nevada

Sector 5
5th Military Assault Command Operations Group (05)
Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington

Sector 6
6th Military Assault Command Operations Group (06)
Iowa, Minnesota, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota and Wisconsin

Sector 7
7th Military Assault Command Operations Group (07)
Delaware, District of Columbia, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania

Sector 8
8th Military Assault Command Operations Group (08)
Africa and the Middle East, including (Armenia, Azerbaijan, Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Jordan, Kuwait, Oman, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Turkey, Yemen, and United Arab Emirates)

Sector 9
9th Military Assault Command Operations Group (09)
Continental Europe, including the old Soviet States

Sector 10
10th Military Assault Command Operations Group (10)
Alaska, Western Canada (Alberta, British Columbia, and Saskatchewan)

Sector 11
11th Military Assault Command Operations Group (11)
New Zealand, Indonesia and Australia

Sector 12
12th Military Assault Command Operations Group (12)
Arkansas, Illinois, Kansas, Missouri and Oklahoma

Sector 13
13th Military Assault Command Operations Group (13)
Manitoba, Ontario, Canada and Michigan

Sector 14
14th Military Assault Command Operations Group (14)
Quebec, Canadian Maritimes (New Brunswick, Newfoundland, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island)

Sector 15
15th Military Assault Command Operations Group (15)
Connecticut, Massachusetts, Maine, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont

Sector 16
16th Military Assault Command Operations Group (15)
Guam, Japan, Micronesia, North and South Korea, Philippines

Sector 17
17th Military Assault Command Operations Group (17)
Colorado, New Mexico, Utah and Wyoming

Sector 18
18th Military Assault Command Operations Group (18)
Mexico, Central America and South America

Sector 19
19th Military Assault Command Operations Group (19)
Asia (Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Burma (Myanmar), China, Cambodia, India, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Mongolia, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Vietnam and Taiwan)

Sector 20
20th Military Assault Command Operations Group (20)
Ireland and Great Britain (England, North Ireland, Scotland, Wales)

Chain of Command (COC)

The purpose of the Chain of Command is to show a clear path of authority. This starts with the individual Special Warfare Operator and moves up through his superiors then up to the Headquarters Staff, then to the MACO Commander. The Chain of Command exists to facilitate the transfer of authority, responsibility, and information from one level to the next.

If you have a problem or an idea which you would like for us to hear and consider, please follow the Chain of Command to contact the appropriate person. This is to ensure that whoever is asked about this will be informed of what the issue or idea is about.

The Chain of Command needs to be followed from Operator all the way up through Detachment Commander to MACO Commander.

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